Writing a qualitative research question

Writing a Good Research Question Writing a Good Research Question The following unit will discuss the basics of how to develop a good research questions and will provide examples of well-designed questions. Identify the process for writing meaningful research questions.

Writing a qualitative research question

Some of these starting phrases are highlighted in blue text in the examples below: How many calories do American men and women consume per day? How often do British university students use Facebook each week?

What are the most important factors that influence the career choices of Australian university students? What proportion of British male and female university students use the top 5 social networks?

What percentage of American men and women exceed their daily calorific allowance? You need to identify what this is. However, how the dependent variable is written out in a research question and what you call it are often two different things.

In the examples below, we have illustrated the name of the dependent variable and highlighted how it would be written out in the blue text.

How to structure quantitative research questions | Lærd Dissertation

Name of the dependent variable How the dependent variable is written out Daily calorific intake How many calories do American men and women consume per day?

Daily calorific intake What percentage of American men and women exceed their daily calorific allowance? Weekly Facebook usage How often do British university students use Facebook each week? Factors influencing writing a qualitative research question choices What are the most important factors that influence the career choices of Australian university students?

Use of the top 5 social networks What proportion of British male and female university students use the top 5 social networks? The first two examples highlight that while the name of the dependent variable is the same, namely daily calorific intake, the way that this dependent variable is written out differs in each case.

THIRD Identify the group s you are interested in All descriptive research questions have at least one group, but can have multiple groups. You need to identify this group s. In the examples below, we have identified the group s in the green text. The examples illustrate the difference between the use of a single group e.

FOURTH Decide whether the dependent variable or group s should be included first, last or in two parts Sometimes it makes more sense for the dependent variable to appear before the group s you are interested in, but sometimes it is the opposite way around.

The following examples illustrate this, with the group s in green text and the dependent variable in blue text: Group 1st; dependent variable 2nd: Dependent variable 1st; group 2nd: Sometimes, the dependent variable needs to be broken into two parts around the group s you are interested in so that the research question flows.

Again, the group s are in green text and the dependent variable is in blue text: Of course, you could choose to restructure the question above so that you do not have to split the dependent variable into two parts.

How many calories are consumed per day by American men and women? When deciding whether the dependent variable or group s should be included first or last, and whether the dependent variable should be broken into two parts, the main thing you need to think about is flow: Does the question flow?

Is it easy to read? FIFTH Include any words that provide greater context to your question Sometimes the name of the dependent variable provides all the explanation we need to know what we are trying to measure. Take the following examples: In the first example, the dependent variable is daily calorific intake i.

Clearly, this descriptive research question is asking us to measure the number of calories American men and women consume per day. In the second example, the dependent variable is Facebook usage per week.The Final Question: “If I answer all these questions will I have achieved the purpose?” QUALITATIVE Research Questions are used if you have a QUALITATIVE Purpose(s) QUANTITATIVE Research Questions are used if you have a QUANTITATIVE Purpose(s).

Research Questions and Hypotheses - This book chapter takes an in-depth look at the principles used to design and write research questions and hypotheses for qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods research and describes the differences in approaches based upon the type of research.

Problem Statement Topic Research Problem Justification for Research Problem Deficiencies in the Evidence •Guidelines for writing –Pose a question.

Writing Good Qualitative Research Questions – Mass Communication Theory What is a research question?
Resource Links It reflects the direction and epistemological underpinnings of your research path.
Mass Communication Theory: from Theory to Practical Application Writing a Good Research Question Writing a Good Research Question The following unit will discuss the basics of how to develop a good research questions and will provide examples of well-designed questions.
College Life How To Do Persuasive Reading Scan the most recently published articles to get a sense of their content.

in qualitative research. •Understand qualitative research as an emerging process.

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Qualitative research, sometimes also referred to as naturalistic inquiry, is a distinct field of research with its own research philosophy, theory and methodology. If your desire is to perform a qualitative study, it will probably be a lot easier to develop your research question if you first become familiar with some of qualitative research’s basic principles.

Within academia, there are two main types of research: quantitative and qualitative. In quantitative research, researchers use experimental designs to examine the relationship among variables. Qualitative research, on the other hand, is a more person-centered approach commonly used in the social.

writing a qualitative research question

For many qualitative market researchers, agreeing on a question to ask an individual or focus group marks the beginning point of any piece of research. Poorly constructed qualitative research questions can affect the outcome of a study, with unclear responses resulting in a considerable waste of resources.

How to Formulate a Qualitative Research Question | The Classroom